Tag Archives: Music

The Obo Addy Legacy Project Receives an NEA Grant

6 Dec

Just in case you missed this in the local press, here’s a copy of the press release.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT:      Susan Addy
December 4, 2012                                                               susan@oboaddylegacyproject.org

THE OBO ADDY LEGACY PROJECT receives NEA grant to support THE MASTERS PROJECT — A tribute concert for NEA National Heritage Fellow Obo Addy (deceased) featuring Jazz Master Randy Weston and his Trio

Grant one of 832 Art Works grants totaling $23.3 million in funding nationwide

obo-addy-legacy-projectPORTLAND, Ore. — National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Chairman Rocco Landesman has announced that the Obo Addy Legacy Project is one of 832 non-profit organizations nationwide to receive an NEA Art Works grant. The Obo Addy Legacy Project is recommended for a $12,500 grant to support a tribute concert to be held one year after Obo’s death.

This project features a collaboration with The Obo Addy Legacy Project traditional drummers from Ghana and the Randy Weston Trio showing the connections between jazz and West African music. Randy Weston and his group will be offering an outreach activity at Cleveland High School for students in the jazz program.

“I’m proud to announce these 832 grants to the American public including The Obo Addy Legacy Project,” said Chairman Landesman. “These projects offer extraordinary examples of creativity in our country, including the creation of new work, innovative ways of engaging audiences, and exemplary education programs.”

Susan Addy said, “This project was a dream of Obo’s – to showcase his rhythms and the traditions of his country with the artistry and creativity of Randy Weston and his African infused work.”

In March 2012, the NEA received 1,509 eligible applications for Art Works requesting more than $74 million in funding. The 832 recommended NEA grants total $22.3 million, span 13 artistic disciplines and fields, and focus primarily on the creation of work and presentation of both new and existing works for the benefit of American audiences. Applications were reviewed by panels of outside experts convened by NEA staff and each project was judged on its artistic excellence and artistic merit.

For a complete listing of projects recommended for Art Works grant support, please visit the NEA website at www.arts.gov.

source: Susan Addy

photo: The Oregonian

Featured Artist: Gideon Freudmann

26 Nov
Gideon Freudmann with cellos

Gideon Freudmann in his studio with a few cellos.

Hometown hero Gideon Freudmann has been teaching with Young Audiences for 11 years (first on the YA roster in Massachusetts then in Connecticut – he still teaches regularly on the east coast – and in Oregon for the last seven year) and blowing up the inter/national circuit with his electric cello compositions and performances. Portlanders can hear (and see) Gideon with The Portland Cello Project (December 13 & 14 – Aladdin Theatre), Caravan Gogh, and as a soloist playing live accompaniment to silent films (December 8 – The General at TaborSpace). Everyone else can catch Gideon on NPR’s All Things Considered, in the soundtrack to Weeds, or on one of his 17 CDs. And for that special little someone in your life, you might consider Gideon’s CD CelloTales (with story teller Leeny Del Seamonds) which won a Parents Choice award in 2005.

What is your art practice outside of teaching?  Composer, Recording artist, performer. As a composer I write mostly for solo electric cello and (acoustic) cello ensembles that bring out the best in traditional and modern music. I perform many of my ensembles with the Portland Cello Project.

In my recordings and live performances I employ electronic technology to create layered textures, pushing the boundaries of traditional cello music. I play the electric cello and use delays, loopers and other “toys” to take the cello well out of the classical realm. Here’s a video of a live solo performance of “Robin Hood Changes His Oil:”

Here is a video of a piece I wrote called, “Denmark”. This short film made made by Two Penguins Productions, won awards at numerous international film festivals:

How does Oregon inspire your art making?  I love nature. The beauty of the mountains, coast and everything in between are an endless source of joy and inspiration for me. Portland in particular is home to a tremendously talented and diverse collection of musicians. There is a sense of community among them and a very supportive environment. Also, all that rain makes it easier to stay indoors and get some work done! Continue reading

Featured Artist: Andy Furgeson aka Red Yarn

15 Oct

Andy Furgeson aka Red Yarn

This week’s featured artist is none other than Andy Furgeson, aka Red Yarn: a one man (and sometimes band) of music, puppets, and forest creatures fun. An Austin, TX native and YA Roster artist since March 2011, this fall Red Yarn went full time as a teaching artist and can be found performing at schools, libraries, and community centers 5+ days a week.

(Look for his full schedule on the Red Yarn website and find his YA artist page here). In January 2010 Andy repurposed the Artclash Fun-A-Day project into Lomax-A-Day: choosing learn, record, and write about one song a day from Alan Lomax‘s 1960 Folk Songs of North America Anthology. Listen to and read from the archive of Andy’s writings and recording on Lomax-A-Day.

How does Oregon inspire your art making? In many ways. First, I’ve learned so much from the incredible community of musicians and artists I’ve found here, inspiring me to make my living by making art. Also, my creative process changes with Oregon’s seasons. In the winter and early spring I spend more time hunkered down, slowly generating new songs, puppets, and show ideas. In late spring, summer and early fall, I am out in the world, performing, collaborating, and letting the sunshine refuel my creative energy. Finally, Oregon’s natural landscape inspires my vision of the Deep Woods, the imagined world where all of my puppet characters live, where all of the animals from American folksongs coexist. Continue reading

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