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Become a Young Audiences Teaching Artist

16 Jan

We want artists who…

  • are committed to inspiring the imaginations of young people
  • know the craft of their art forms deeply, through study and experience, and have their own dynamic artistic practices
  • bring young people into the world of their art forms, and embolden them to explore
  • see themselves as learners and teachers, and seek out opportunities for growth
  • show a willingness to collaborate
  • have experience with, and strategies for, working with the complexities and challenges of school environments
  • are based in the Portland metropolitan area
  • We welcome applications from residency and performing artists in all disciplines. We are especially looking for artists who teach residencies that explore ceramic murals, Mexican folkloric dance, photography, and metal arts. Our programs are based in a 10-county area in Oregon and SW Washington. Schools (especially elementary schools) are the largest populations served, and some programming takes place in community settings. Some of our roster artists also choose to become arts providers for the Right Brain Initiative, through Young Audiences.

Benefits of Becoming a Young Audiences Artist

  • Extensive and diverse opportunities to hone teaching, presentation, and artistic skills, and to network with other artists
  • Reliable payment for services
  • Stipends for professional development
  • Support in planning and working with schools
  • Program publicity via YA’s website and communications with schools

For more information, contact Adam Friedman, Artist Program Specialist, at adam@ya-or.org or 503-225-5900, extension 226.

Click here to get started – the application deadline is Friday, March 15, 2013 at 4:30PM

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The Obo Addy Legacy Project Receives an NEA Grant

6 Dec

Just in case you missed this in the local press, here’s a copy of the press release.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT:      Susan Addy
December 4, 2012                                                               susan@oboaddylegacyproject.org

THE OBO ADDY LEGACY PROJECT receives NEA grant to support THE MASTERS PROJECT — A tribute concert for NEA National Heritage Fellow Obo Addy (deceased) featuring Jazz Master Randy Weston and his Trio

Grant one of 832 Art Works grants totaling $23.3 million in funding nationwide

obo-addy-legacy-projectPORTLAND, Ore. — National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Chairman Rocco Landesman has announced that the Obo Addy Legacy Project is one of 832 non-profit organizations nationwide to receive an NEA Art Works grant. The Obo Addy Legacy Project is recommended for a $12,500 grant to support a tribute concert to be held one year after Obo’s death.

This project features a collaboration with The Obo Addy Legacy Project traditional drummers from Ghana and the Randy Weston Trio showing the connections between jazz and West African music. Randy Weston and his group will be offering an outreach activity at Cleveland High School for students in the jazz program.

“I’m proud to announce these 832 grants to the American public including The Obo Addy Legacy Project,” said Chairman Landesman. “These projects offer extraordinary examples of creativity in our country, including the creation of new work, innovative ways of engaging audiences, and exemplary education programs.”

Susan Addy said, “This project was a dream of Obo’s – to showcase his rhythms and the traditions of his country with the artistry and creativity of Randy Weston and his African infused work.”

In March 2012, the NEA received 1,509 eligible applications for Art Works requesting more than $74 million in funding. The 832 recommended NEA grants total $22.3 million, span 13 artistic disciplines and fields, and focus primarily on the creation of work and presentation of both new and existing works for the benefit of American audiences. Applications were reviewed by panels of outside experts convened by NEA staff and each project was judged on its artistic excellence and artistic merit.

For a complete listing of projects recommended for Art Works grant support, please visit the NEA website at www.arts.gov.

source: Susan Addy

photo: The Oregonian

Selfless Promotion – HALLOWEEN!

10 Oct

Vagabond Opera’s Annual Halloween Bash and Ten Year Anniversary Party!
The Transylvanian Voodoo Ball

With Chervona, Rachel Brice, Dum Spiro Spero with Flip Cassidy and the Junkyard Gospel and more!

Vagabond Opera Group Photo

Vagabond Opera

Vagabond Opera raises the dead in style at their sixth annual Halloween bash! The event will ALSO mark the TEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY of the band! Held in the vintage restored Star Theater (Portland’s historic 1911 silent film and Burlesque venue) Vagabond Opera presents a stunning night of haunting music, dance, ritual and art for honoring our ancestors and those who have passed. Whether you want to dance, party or pray this night is for you!

Vagabond Opera Halloween

a stunning night of haunting music, dance, ritual and art…

Featuring Russian party band Chervona, Haunting Appalachian tunes by Dum Spiro Spero with Flip Cassidy and the Junkyard Gospel and Belly dance by Rachel Brice and Karolina Lux. Also featuring wandering Butoh performers and an sacred fire ritual honoring our ancestors. The evening will also encourage audience participation with an interactive Day of the Dead altar, psychic Dino tarot readings, Lulu’s Chocolates and more for a truly eclectic and spell binding evening. Costumes highly encouraged!

Wed, October 31st

Vagabond Opera’s Annual Halloween Bash and Ten Year Anniversary

The Transylvanian Voodoo Ball

With Chervona, Dum Spiro Spero with Flip Cassidy and the Junkyard Gospel
Belly Dance by Rachel Brice and Karolina Lux
Wandering Butoh performers, Dino Tarot Readings and an interactive Day of the Dead Altar!
Costumes encouraged!
8 p.m. doors | 9 p.m. show
Star Theater, 13 NW 6th Avenue
TIckets: $16 advance | $20 door | 21+
   Buy online at www.startheaterportland.com
Call: 503-248-4700
View info online at www.vagabondopera.com/halloween

source: Vagabond Opera

Chase Community Grant

18 Sep

This something we don’t normally do, but it would be a wasted opportunity if we didn’t at least make a small mention.

We were nominated for a Chase Community Giving grant (woohoo!) but need to be one of the charities with the most votes to qualify for funds. Can you please take a moment and vote for us? Voting closes tomorrow,  Wednesday the 19th.

Here’s the link: http://apps.facebook.com/chasecommunitygiving/charity/view/ein/93-0521848?ref=a05eabdee8
You have to vote through facebook which is a little bit weird. They ask you to allow an app before you can vote. You can always vote, then go back and disallow the app when you’re done!

Also, please spread the word to your other friends and contacts so we can make it happen!

Become a Young Audiences Teaching Artist

6 Sep

INTERESTED IN BECOMING A YOUNG AUDIENCES ARTIST?

We want artists who…

  • are committed to inspiring the imaginations of young people
  • know the craft of their art forms deeply, through study and experience, and have their own dynamic artistic practices
  • bring young people into the world of their art forms, and embolden them to explore
  • see themselves as learners and teachers, and seek out opportunities for growth
  • show a willingness to collaborate
  • have experience with, and strategies for, working with the complexities and challenges of school environments
  • are based in the Portland metropolitan area

Greta Pedersen at Lee Elementary

We welcome applications from residency and performing artists in all disciplines. At this time we are particularly searching for Teaching Artists that specialize in technology based mediums (video/film, graphic design, fashion, culinary arts, animation, etc). Our programs are based in a 10-county area in Oregon and SW Washington. Schools (especially elementary schools) are the largest populations served, and some programming takes place in community settings. Some of our roster artists also choose to become arts providers for the Right Brain Initiative, through Young Audiences.

Benefits of Becoming a Young Audiences Artist

  • Extensive and diverse opportunities to hone teaching, presentation, and artistic skills, and to network with other artists
  • Reliable payment for services
  • Stipends for professional development
  • Support in planning and working with schools
  • Program publicity via YA’s website, communications with schools, and the Artist Showcase

Performing artists set their own fees; residency/workshop artists have a standard fee per hour for teaching, preparation, and planning. See the Educator’s Guide section of our website for more details. Note that fees listed on artist pages include YA’s 25% administrative and programming fee.

How to Apply

Our next application deadline is in Oct 5, 2012. Please see the Services for Artists/Become A YA Artist section of the website for the application. And if you have any questions, contact Adam Friedman, Artist Programs Specialist: Adam@ya-or.org or 503-225-5900 x226.

Schools and Arts Together

23 Aug

National Average versus Portland Schools

Today in Portland there are nearly 12,000 children attending schools that do not have any art, dance, drama, or music instruction. And the rate of decline for arts education here has been shockingly steep. Portland is home to six school districts and in the last five years, two of them (Parkrose and Centennial) have cut their arts and music teaching staff by half, while our largest (Portland Public Schools) has dropped all arts instruction in 22 schools in just two years.

With the Arts Education and Access Fund, the City of Portland will restore arts education by providing stable, long-term funding for certified teachers for every
elementary school serving Portland residents and support arts organizations citywide to improve access to the arts in every classroom and community.

Join us at http://SchoolsArtsTogether.com and ‘Like’ us at http://Facebook.com/SchoolsArtsTogether. After years of losing ground, we can ensure our children have the future they deserve, today and tomorrow.

courtesy: Keith Daly, Creative Advocacy Network

Comic-Con, Atomic Testing and Hot Wheel Dreams – The Connecting Thread

26 Jul

(I wrote this Monday while flying home…)

Metropolis II

This time as I’m writing this, I’m about 34000 feet up and over the South San Francisco Bay. Comic-Con, Las Vegas and the return trip to LA is now behind me, with Portland in front. Let’s start off with San Diego Comic-Con International.

Picking up the badge for this year was astonishingly easy, compared to the 4 hours it took last year.  As usual, Comic-Con was pure madness this year as there were an additional 5,000 people attending pushing the total number of people there up to 130,000, and it showed.  Hall H is the largest room for panel discussions, holding something like 8,000 to 10,000 people, and like what has been happening the last few years, people line up the night before.  This year saw something new – people camping out for Ballroom 20, which seats about 4,000 to 5,000 people.  A lot of the panels I’m interested in are held in that room, so on Thursday, we weren’t able to get in. Such is the price you pay. However, here’s some of what I and thousands of others saw during the conference (yes, Comic-Con is a conference).

I left San Diego for Los Angeles on Monday via the train, got picked up at Union Station and immediately drove the 4 hours to Las Vegas, were my room at the Luxor was waiting, in the pyramid, on the 23rd floor. To get to my room, there were no elevators, but inclinators, since they went up at an angle.  A little discomforting the first time going up and down, but you get used to it. That night, like thousands of other people, we tripped around the strip, walking between the hotels north of the Luxor, all the way to City Center, which is pretty cool.

The next day, Tuesday of last week, was the Imperial Palace to see the auto collection. I have more than a passing interest in automobiles, so this was pretty cool, seeing some rare, classic cars.  And the price of admission was perfect – free. The rest of the day was tripping around some more via the monorail and having dinner with my family who live there.

Wednesday was the day we went to both sides of Las Vegas; Red Rock Canyon and the Hoover Dam. Red Rock Canyon is just outside of Sumerlin, on the western edge of the city, about a 10 minute drive from the nearest example of civilization.  Once there, the new visitors center, which opened in 2009, greets you. I was pretty impressed with the place and how it approaches educating everyone from children to nerds like myself with a lot of interactive tools. The canyon itself has a 13 mile loop through it for vehicular traffic and lots of view points, often with trailheads for hiking.  Since it was nearly 100 degrees that day and we still had to get to the dam, we decided not to take a hike; however, I would recommend doing so as some of the hikes allow you to see some pretty amazing sights. The one thing I really enjoyed was the near absolute silence.

Mike O’Callaghan–Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge

My friend Greg, who I was traveling with, kept telling me about this bridge that crosses over the gorge where Hoover Dam is, and was surprised I knew next to nothing about it since I tend to follow architectural stories from all around the world. I guess it was one of those things I just missed. To a certain a degree, I’m glad I did. When you cross the bridge, unless you’re in a very high vehicle, you won’t be able to see the dam. However, when you head down to the dam itself, you come around a corner and there’s the underside of the bridge.  And it’s MASSIVE.  The arch of the structure is the widest concrete arch in the western hemisphere and to be quite honest, it’s pretty amazing.

Our final day in Las Vegas found us at the National Atomic Testing Museum, part of the Smithsonian.  Again, this was another well thought out and interactive place. Don’t go expecting to learn much about area 51, though – that is a seperate exhibit to this one. Essentially, the museum is about exactly what it’s name implies – it’s about the atomic testing range Northwest of Las Vegas, nuclear technology and the history of the cold war.

After leaving leaving Las Vegas, we pulled off the main highway in Jean, and headed towards

The Pioneer Saloon, Goodsprings, Nevada

Goodsprings. The reason I mention this is becasue as a kid, from the early 70’s through the early 80’s, we would make a trip here in June, after school let out, and again in November for Thanksgiving. My great-grandmother was the PostMaster in town and it had been nearly 30 years since I was last there. I’m happy to say, not much has changed. Except this time I got to go into the saloon, have lunch and get the history of the place, which I never knew as a kid.

Upon returning to Los Angeles, I finally made it to LACMA to see Metropolis II.  And I wasn’t disappointed.  I spent nearly a half hour in there, filming with my phone (it does pretty good 1080HD) the exhibit in motion from various angles.  As a kid, you couldn’t imagine this even if you tried, but it’s exactly what you always wanted to do with your H0t Wheels. The price of admission for this alone was worth it (more links to what I filmed at the bottom).

And now I’m on my way home, then back to the office in a few days.  I’m always amazed how fast the time goes by; at the beginning, it feels like it will last forever, then suddenly it’s over. This was time well spent.

Video 2, Video 3, Video 4, Video 5, Video 6, Video 7 (all are under a minute long)

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